Introduction

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Drummers

 

 

2nd (QUEENS ROYAL)

Regiment of Foot

 

Images - A Tribute

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11 12 13 14 15

Drum Horses

 
 

Knapsacks

 
 

Before 1805 the British soldier was issued a Goatskin Knapsack and then a Canvass Envolope knapsack which was rounded at the ends and usually coloured as below. In that year, the Trotter Frame Knapsack was first introduced and was quickly adopted as the official British knapsack. There were two Trotter Packs, the first had rounded ends (Frame Knapsack), made of canvas and was constructed as shown above being opened, and the other the model (the Box Knapsack) was made of black lacquered canvass reinforced at the corners with squares of leather. To give the knapsack a rectangular appearance it was fitted with board at the top, bottom and sides, the Trotter Knapsack was worn on the back by shoulder straps which extended around the arms and at the waist.

1854 pattern Trotter knapsack. Black waterproofed canvas on wooden frame. RWF pattern shown with black leather strapping, black leather corner re-inforcement and buff internal straps. Other regimental configurations to order
http://www.users.globalnet..uk/~thinred/valises_1854.htm

TROTTER PACK Black canvas, black leather straps, brass buckles, timber internal frame.
http://home.vicnet.net.au/~second95/equipmentlist.ht

Trotter Back Pack
The Trotter back pack was made of painted linen canvas sewn over a wooden box with white straps. The box shape was maintained by a timber frame and was introduced in 1803. They were manufactured by Mr. Trotter of Soho. The white leather shoulder straps of the pack were fastened across the chest by a horizontal strap.
The number of the Regiment was painted in white on the back panel. The soldiers regimental number and company were painted in smaller letters on the right hand side, bottom edge. A great coat or tightly rolled grey blanket was strapped to the top of the pack. Also a personal mess tin was strapped to this great coat or blanket.
These packs were not liked by the soldier as the restrictive chest strap made long marches very uncomfortable. The chest strap gradually squeezed the chest and made it harder to breathe. The chest strap combined with the hard edge of the rigid wooden frame made these back packs very unpopular.
http://home.vicnet.net.au/~rhra42/uniforms.htm

 
 

1750-1770 1795 1798

1815 1820 1830-54

1838 1852

 
 

These images are from the publication - Pierre Turner,Soldiers' Accoutrements of the British Army 1750-1900,Crowood Press Ltd, Whiltshire. 2006.

 
 

Haversack

 
 

Haversacks were classed as camp equipment and were intended to carry food rations.

In the case of the first example shown here below dated 1812 - 'There was one pattern of Haversack for both mounted and dismounted services and Commissariat Accounts of 1810 list 10,000 haversacks, twenty-one inches wide, twelve inches deep, with a lap over five inches with two buttons and holes.

The sling to be in length thirty-five inches and two inches wide. In 1813 the sling or strap was discribed as 'girth web' two inches wide. It was made of linen or canvas, including the strap which is thirty-six inches long in total. *note the top corner flaps are stitched down. The two buttons are made of wooden discs covered in fabric; they do not have shanks and are sewn directly to the fabric.'

Pierre Turner,Soldiers' Accoutrements of the British Army 1750-1900,Crowood Press Ltd, Whiltshire. 2006.

(p23) Haversack c.1812, General Service. National Army museum.

The haversack or bread bag was also a campaign issue. Made of canvass or course linen it was designed to carry a soldier’s rations during extensive marches. Usually the soldier carried rations enough for three days. Often the haversack became an aid to foraging when soldiers were required to live off the land. Like the canteen it was worn on the left side by a sling which also served to restrict the soldier’s free movements.

http://www.signalhilltattoo.ca/Battery.htm

 
 

1812 1854 1867

 
  These images are from the publication - Pierre Turner,Soldiers' Accoutrements of the British Army 1750-1900,Crowood Press Ltd, Whiltshire. 2006